1904 World's Fair
The Louisiana Purchase Exposition
St. Louis, Missouri

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at Night
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Main Entrance to the Art Palaces

Main Entrance to the Art Palaces

The Art Palaces are so distinct in character from the other buildings at the Exposition that it seemed necessary to remove them from the general picture, and their position just behind the Terrace of States is fitting.  There they are accessible from all directions.  All of these noble buildings are necessarily fireproof, and the central pavilion, 348 by 166 feet, is to be permanently preserved.   The central hall of this main pavilion, with a high-arched roof, is given up to a sculptural display.  The galleries of this building are filled with the largest and best collection of the work of American artists that has ever been brought together.  The work in the west galleries is that of men trained at Paris and Rome, and in the east side is the work of the artists who have been influenced by German, English and Dutch training.  The other buildings of the group, at the east and west, are filled with the work of every art-producing country on the globe.  Germany, France, Great Britain and Holland have made notable displays, filling many of the well lighted rooms.  The visitor who seeks the aesthetic and liberalizing effect of the World's Fair will devote many of his hours to this wonderful collection. 

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